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The 1st Proletarian Shock Brigade

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  Supreme Commander Tito inspects the First Proletarian Brigade in 1942 The first proletarian People's Liberation Strike Brigade was the first partisan brigade in occupied Yugoslavia. During the war, it was considered an elite unit of the People's Liberation Army of Yugoslavia.   It was formed on December 21, 1941, in Rudo, by partisan insurgents, after retreating to Sandzak. The decision to form the First Proletarian Brigade was made by the Central Committee of the CPY. On the day of its formation, it had six battalions (four from Serbia and two from Montenegro) with a total strength of 1,200 fighters. The first commander of the brigade was Koca Popovic, political commissar Filip Kljajic Fica. The First Proletarian Brigade had 530 major and minor battles in 1,240 war days, that is, it spent almost every other day in battle. The other days were mostly spent in exhausting marches.   Koča Popović The First Proletarian Brigade covered more than 20,000 kilometers on its w

Interesting facts and figures on the Balkans in May 1942

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Stjepan Filipović a few moments before his death   May 9 - Second Italian Army renamed the Main Command of Slovenia - Dalmatia (Supersloda), Commander Mario Roatta. May 10 - The occupier announces that there are no more Jews in Belgrade (since 2015, Holocaust Remembrance Day in Belgrade). May 10 - Operation Trio, Operation Foca: Italians capture Foca. Fighters of the 4th Kraljevo Battalion of the First Proletarian Brigade on the road Foča - Goražde, May 1, 1942. Operation "Foca" was a joint operation of the Wehrmacht, the Italian army, and the NDH forces against partisans and Chetniks in the area of Foca. It was held from May 5 to 12, 1942. May 15 - June 3 - Operation Forstrat: unsuccessful German attempt to capture Draža Mihailović - goes to Montenegro. Operation Forester was a German search operation in the Ibar Valley, in order to capture the Chetnik leader Draža Mihailović, who was then hiding with his headquarters on Mount Golija. May 16 - Prijedor liberated.

The Air Force of the Independent State of Croatia

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  Air Force badge The NDH Air Force was established on April 19, 1941, with the appointment of Vladimir Kren as Commander of the Air Force Department. In June 1941, an agreement was reached with the Germans on the establishment of permanent airports and the takeover of captured aircraft from the former Kingdom of Yugoslavia. As a result of this agreement, the NDH Air Force established two airports: Zagreb and Sarajevo. On September 14, 1943, Adalbert Rogulja became the head of the Battalion, who remained in that position until the disintegration of the Independent State of Croatia. During its existence, the NDH Air Force was reorganized several times, and during the reorganization, the name was also changed, so that from February 1943 it was called the Croatian Air Force (HBZ). The command published the semi-monthly magazine Hrvatska krila. The Breguet 19 was a French-designed aircraft built under license in Yugoslavia for the Royal Yugoslav Air Force. The ZNDH made use of some 50 capt

Navy of the Independent State of Croatia

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  Naval Ensign of the Independent State of Croatia 1941 (from 1944 Naval Jack). The Navy of the Independent State of Croatia was the navy of the Independent State of Croatia during its existence. Right from the start, it was limited by the provisions of the Treaties of Rome and the Italian occupation of Dalmatia and Kvarner. Most of the navy spent the first half of the war on the eastern battlefield as the Croatian Naval Complex - the Black Sea. A somewhat better situation arose after the capitulation of Italy in 1943. However, the presence of a much stronger Kriegsmarine on the Adriatic ruled out the need for a separate Croatian navy, and the British navy and partisans dealt it heavy blows. After frequent desertions, the Germans abolished it and took over a small fleet. After 1943, it was called the Croatian Navy. designation Navy of the Independent State of Croatia On April 18, 1941, a decision on the organization of the army and navy of the Croatian Home Guard was published in the

Ground Forces of the Independent State of Croatia

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  Home Guard on St. Mark's Square, October 1942 The Army (initially the Land Forces) was a land component of the armed forces of the NDH (Home Guard) from 1941 to 1945. The Home Guard also included the Navy and the Air Force. At the beginning of the creation of the Independent State of Croatia, various names appeared - Croatian Army, Land Forces, Croatian Land Army. However, with the establishment of the Ministry of Home Guard and the General Staff, the name Ground Forces began to be used. With the establishment of the Ministry of the Armed Forces (MINORS) in January 1943, the name Home Guard was increasingly used for the Army, while only members of the Army were called Home Guard, initially unofficially and later more and more officially. That is why even today the name home guard is often misused only for the army. Panzer I tank of the Croatian Home Guard In the first months of the Independent State of Croatia, the headquarters and then the command of the land forces were est

The Croatian Home Guard Part I

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  Croatian Trefoil, a symbol of the Home Guard The Croatian Home Guard (since November 1942 the Home Guard) was the name for the regular armed forces of the Independent State of Croatia. The task of the Home Guard was to defend the new state from domestic and foreign enemies. It was divided into the Army, Navy, and Air Force. The National Protection and the State Labor Service also operated under the command of the Ministry of Home Guard. The Home Guard failed to play a significant role during the war due to several factors - poor motivation, frequent desertion, sympathy for the partisans, rivalry with the Ustashas, incompetent, mostly older officers, and lack of heavy, especially armored weapons. The ground army with a classical organization could not adequately respond to the guerrilla, partisan mode of warfare. In November 1944, after the open division of entire Home Guard units to the partisan side, the Home Guard and Ustasha units were merged into a single Croatian Armed Forces.

Attacks on garrisons Independent State of Croatia

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  Fighters of the Mostar Battalion on the move towards Kupres, 1942. Attacks on garrisons were, along with attacks on communications, an integral part of partisan strategy and tactics developed on the territory of occupied Yugoslavia during World War II. These attacks had multiple meanings: They enabled the formation and expansion of free territory They were a way of supplying troops and people in the free territory They were an important part of the effort to weaken the enemy militarily, politically, and morally. The uprising in occupied Yugoslavia in September 1941. The Independent State of Croatia was formed with the help of occupation troops, but as a puppet creation without sufficient support among the people, it failed to gain control over its territory during the entire war. The administrative system of the NDH was very shaken by the uprising of the NDH in 1941. Later during the war, especially from the middle of 1942, the NOVJ managed to force the NDH to strategically defend it